Course Catalog


Dear Parents and Students,

Thank you for taking the time to understand the course offerings available to you from Sarah E. Goode STEM Academy. Please let this guide serve as a resource to you when you are preparing to select your course of study at Goode. Please note, not all courses are offered every semester. You will need to speak with your counselor to determine the appropriate courses in which to enroll and to receive updated information about which courses are being offered in the upcoming semester. Also, if there are courses that you would like see offered at Goode that are not listed please notify your child’s counselor. While we cannot honor all requests due to budget and personnel constraints we will use your suggestions as we plan for subsequent years at our school.

Thank you,
Sarah E. Goode STEM Academy Administration

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CPS Graduation requirements can be downloaded below:
CPS High School Graduation Requirements.PDF

Course Catalog Page 1

Course Catalog Page 2

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  • English I
    Prerequisite: None
    Description:

    In English I students will engage in grade level Common Core State Standards (CCSS) aligned reading and writing practices, through a wide range of literary and informational texts to bridge their learning from middle school to high school. Students will engage in practices to support their emerging mastery of the CCSS for Writing in their grade band, and express themselves in multiple writing formats including narratives, investigative reports, literary analyses, and research papers. Across all writing formats, students will write in the conventions of the CCSS writing modes. Students in English I will employ academic English in discussion that align to CCSS for Speaking & Listening.

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  • English II
    Prerequisite: None
    Description:

    In English II, students will engage in grade level Common Core State Standards (CCSS) aligned reading and writing practices, through a wide range of literary and informational texts that will build upon English I. Students will engage in practices to support their mastery of the CCSS for Writing in their grade band, and express themselves in multiple writing formats including narratives, investigative reports, literary analyses, and research papers. Across all writing formats, students will write in the conventions of the CCSS writing modes. Students in English II will employ academic English in discussion that align to CCSS for Speaking & Listening.

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  • English III
    Prerequisite: None
    Description:

    In English III, we will examine complex texts through close reading, analyze character, structure, word choice, and point of view, write extended/timed essays synthesizing multiple sources in MLA format, and increase our knowledge of Standard English to better succeed in academic and workplace settings. This class meets for a double period for one semester, and upon completion students will receive (1) credit.

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  • English IV
    Prerequisite: None
    Description:

    English 4 students will explore various modes of nonfiction and fiction texts, including comics, short films, poems and songs, and essays, in order to develop student literacy for both college and the working world. Writing projects include a personal narrative comic, literary analysis of popular hip-hop songs, and a documentary film. Students will acquire proficiency in diverse types of writing, research strategies, the conventions of standard English grammar, and the application of verbal and nonverbal techniques. The pace and complexity of the coursework will reflect a 12th grade English course and homework will be assigned daily.

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  • English 101
    Prerequisite: Qualifying COMPASS Score and acceptance to Dual Credit Program
    Description:

    English 101 students will investigate the culture, politics, and economics of modernism to determine how the phenomenon affects subjectivity today. Readings are drawn from a wide variety of college-level literary and theoretical texts. Through extended reading, writing, research, and other projects, students will develop the ability to recognize, critique, and transform their world. The course stresses expository writing and a formal research paper must be completed to receive credit. The pace and complexity of coursework reflects a college course.

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  • English 102
    Prerequisite: C or higher in English 101
    Description:

    Continuation of English 101. Introduces methods of research and writing of investigative papers. Writing assignments, as appropriate to the discipline, are part of the course.

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  • Multicultural Literature
    Prerequisite: None
    Description:

    Multicultural literature is an 11th-12th grade elective course that exposes innovators to the complex and diverse cultural and social realities of various cultures and subgroups in American society, while asking each innovator to explore the foundations of and influences in his or her own culture(s). Innovators will explore multicultural perspectives through various poems, films and video clips, American foundational texts, music, short stories, non-fictional news accounts, and interviews. Each medium used in class will be geared towards a common theme: the creation, acceptance, and pursuit of one’s identity through culture.Innovators will explore who they are, American ideals and the influence of media and pop culture, social injustices, and civic responsibility. For this course, innovators will be writing persuasively and creatively on a daily basis and participating in a range of collaborative, reflective, and academic discussions and conversations, hereby encouraging innovators to partake in expressing their experiences growing up in America with literary professionalism. This course focuses on literature by and about people from various population groups that have traditionally been underrepresented in the United States. We will discuss literature from parallel cultures (including works by and about African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, Middle Eastern Americans, and other ethnic groups), as well as literature by and about population groups traditionally defined by class, religion, ability, gender, and sexuality. Innovators will investigate theoretical perspectives, issues, controversies, and classroom implications for these texts and apply many of their findings to their understandings of self and civic responsibility.

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  • Communications I for ELL
    Prerequisite: ELL Students in Program
    Description:

    This course is designed for ELs enrolled in English as a Second Language (ESL) I at the Entering-Emerging levels of English language proficiency, as defined in the WorldClass Instructional Design and Assessment (WIDA) English Language Proficiency Performance definitions adopted by the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE). Communications I for ELs focuses on further developing students’ receptive and productive skills in reading/writing and listening/ speaking. Students participate in individual and group structured instructional activities that directly target the development of reading/writing and listening/speaking, with emphasis on developing academic vocabulary in context. Materials are the same as those used in ESL I curriculum with consistent exposure to complex texts, a variety of text types, aligned to Common Core State Standards (CCSS), WIDA English Language Development standards (ELD), and CCSS genres to meet the language needs of students.

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  • AP English Language and Composition
    Prerequisite: B or higher in English I and II
    Description:

    Students in this introductory college-level course read and carefully analyze a broad and challenging range of nonfiction. A main objective of the course is for students to become close readers, scholarly critics, and proficient rhetoricians. Through a mastery of skills in close reading and analysis, students develop their ability to work with language and text with a greater awareness of understanding of purpose, strategy, and style. Students become aware and begin to consciously employ schemes and tropes, execute precise diction, consider audience, apply ethos, pathos, and logos, thus enhancing their own composing abilities in a myriad of rhetorical implementations. In addition students will broaden their vocabulary through the reading selections with an emphasis on definition and application of rhetorical terminology. The purpose of this course is to help students write effectively and confidently in their college courses across the curriculum and in their professional and personal lives. The course is organized according to the requirements and guidelines of the current AP English Course Description.

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  • Senior Seminar
    Prerequisite: None
    Description:

    The course focus is on postsecondary education, and innovators will explore, thoroughly plan, and prepare for life after high school. Planning and applying to colleges and postsecondary schools will be the primary goal of the first semester. Innovators will participate in every phase of college preparation and planning—researching and matching with colleges, writing personal statements, requesting letters of recommendation, submitting applications and financial aid forms, applying for scholarships, and exploring careers and other postsecondary options.

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  • Algebra
    Prerequisite: None
    Description:

    Algebra I is one of the first time students will be introduced to mathematics as a way of describing one’s reality. Variables and functions allow us to create mathematical models for real-world problems. Whereas previously, mathematics has only allowed us to perform computations, Algebra I begins to give us the skills required to interpret, describe, and model the real-world as it changes. The study of linear equations and functions will be covered using graphs and data analysis, rates of change, slopes, and finding equations related to these items. Exponents and polynomials will be covered with emphasis on practical applications such as growth and decay and compound interest. There is a significant amount of reading and writing involved in this course; students are expected to write in complete sentences and coherent paragraphs. Students who pass both semesters of Algebra I will earn one credit toward high school graduation.

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  • Advanced Algebra (Algebra II)
    Prerequisite: Algebra I or Algebra Competency Exam
    Description:

    The course is designed to allow students to think, analyze, process, and discuss mathematics. Algebra II is an extension of Algebra I with connections to geometry and trigonometry. This will be an in-depth exploration of function families well beyond linear equations. Topics include quadratic, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, radical, rational, and trigonometric functions. Within each function family, emphasis will be paid to graphing, zeros, extrema, domain, range, intervals of increase and decrease, regressions, and real-life applications. There is a significant amount of reading and writing involved in this course; students are expected to write in complete sentences and coherent paragraphs. Students who pass both semesters of Algebra I will earn one credit toward high school graduation.

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  • Geometry
    Prerequisite: None
    Description:

    Geometry is a course that develops your intuition of the physical world by exploring objects in two and three dimensions. Furthermore it provides students with reasoning and critical thinking skills that are useful far beyond the reaches of the math classroom. Geometry is an integral skill used for design and implementation, but also has an impact in such far ranging fields as music, biology and computer science.

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  • College Algebra
    Prerequisite: None
    Description:

    College Algebra covers a variety of algebra topics that are considered the gatekeepers to the understanding of upper level mathematics courses. These topics include functions, graphs of functions, solving and graphing equations and inequalities, polynomials, factoring, rational expressions and functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, and linear systems.

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  • Trigonometry
    Prerequisite: None
    Description:

    Trigonometry is a field of mathematics in which the geometric properties of angles are used to measure lengths. Real-world problems involving trigonometry are common in engineering, physics, construction and design. Topics include right-triangle relationships, the unit circle, the sine, cosine, and tangent functions and their applications, the law of sines and cosines, trigonometric graphing, solving trigonometric equations, and verifying trigonometric identities. Trigonometric models will often be used to model periodic functions in a real-life context.

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  • Statistics
    Prerequisite: None
    Description:

    Decisions or predictions are often based on data—numbers in context. These decisions or predictions would be easy if the data always sent a clear message. The field of statistics provides tools for gathering, displaying, summarizing, examining, and interpreting data with clarity and precision. This course will introduce students to four major conceptual themes: 1. observing and exploring data, planning a statistically valid investigation, anticipating patterns and using probability and simulations for predicting outcomes, and confirming or rejecting models based on statistical inference. Students should have a solid foundation in algebra prior to enrollment. Technology is an integral part of the course. All students will be required to conduct a valid statistical investigation and submit a complete analysis for successful completion of the course.

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  • AP Statistics
    Prerequisite: B or higher in previous Math classes
    Description:

    This course is an extensive and rigorous course where students will develop their abilities in mathematical modeling, including the process of data collection, representation, interpretation, and simulation. Through investigation of real-life contexts, students will develop a rich understanding of statistical analysis and how to draw conclusions from data. This course incorporates the frequent use of technology, projects, cooperative group problem solving, and writing, as the tools to develop understanding of statistical methods. Prerequisites for this course include a mathematics department recommendation and a passing score on the placement exam given at the end of January. Students who take this course must take the AP exam.

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  • Financial Literacy
    Prerequisite: None
    Description:

    Personal Finance will equip students with the knowledge, skills, and tools to make informed decisions that will impact them in the present and future. Students engage in the fundamentals of economic principles and a decision-making process and will evaluate the costs and benefits of career choices, saving and investment strategies, purchasing alternatives, and risk management strategies. Students will participate in real-world, hands-on activities aligned to the Common Core State Standards that will develop their skills for reading and writing, and the analysis of complex texts, including college applications, credit reports, and loan applications.

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  • Virtual Enterprise International
    Prerequisite: None
    Description:

    With an emphasis on college and career readiness, VEI is an in-school, live, global business simulation that offers students a competitive edge through project-based, collaborative learning and the development of 21st-century skills in entrepreneurship, global business, problem solving, communication, personal finance and technology.

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  • World Studies
    Prerequisite: None
    Description:

    World Studies is a semester-long course that studies the history of the world from prehistoric to modern times. Students focus on the key developments and events that have shaped civilization across time. The course is organized thematically and, within broad eras, regionally. Lessons address developments in religion, philosophy, the arts, science and technology, and political history and draws connections to the present. The course also introduces geography concepts and skills within the context of the historical narrative. Students analyze primary sources and maps, create timelines, and complete other projects— practicing historical thinking and writing skills as they explore the broad themes and big ideas of human history. Successful completion of the this course fulfills a requirement for graduation.

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  • US History
    Prerequisite: None
    Description:

    This is a semester long course in which students study the evolution of the United States from Colonization through the Civil War, exploration of the New World and its colonization, study of colonial life with emphasis on cultural heritage, the American Revolution, and the emergence of the nation traced through major trends and events in economic, political, cultural, social and intellectual affairs including past and present American cultural patterns. Writing assignments, as appropriate to the discipline, are part of the course. Students will fulfill two requirements for graduation: Public Law 195 (PL 195), the United States Constitution test and United States History.

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  • Civics
    Prerequisite: None
    Description:

    Civics examines the structure and function of American systems of government and the role of citizens in the political process. This course explores the crucial role that citizens have in accessing power and mediating the forms of power that government and corporations have in American society. Civics classroom work encourages and leads students to authentic democratic participation and builds a strong sense of civic identity. Instruction is student-centered, utilizes multiple resources and pedagogical strategies, provides access to multiple forms of complex text, and is driven by authentic group projects.

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  • Psychology
    Prerequisite: None
    Description:

    This course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major sub-fields within psychology. You will also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice.

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  • Physics
    Prerequisite: None
    Description:

    Physics is a standard introductory course into the scientific study of forces, motions, waves and energy that is designed for students who are developing their problem-solving and analytical skills. Students taking Physics will regularly experience hands-on, inquiry-based learning opportunities. Students will engage in the Science and Engineering Practices as outlined in A Framework for K-12 Science Education and the Next Generation Science Standards to learn about essential Big Ideas such as force and motion, waves, and interactions of energy and matter.

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  • Chemistry
    Prerequisite: None
    Description:

    Chemistry is a standard introductory course into the scientific study of the properties of matter and the changes that matter undergoes during reactions that is designed for students who are developing their problem-solving and analytic skills. Students taking Chemistry will regularly experience hands-on, inquiry-based learning opportunities. Students will engage in the Science and Engineering Practices as outlined in A Framework for K-12 Science Education and the Next Generation Science Standards to learn about essential Big Ideas such as structure and properties of matter and chemical reactions.

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  • Biology
    Prerequisite: None
    Description:

    Biology is a standard introductory course into the scientific study of life and life processes that is designed for students who are developing their problem-solving and analytical skills. Students taking Biology will regularly experience hands-on, inquiry-based learning opportunities. Students will engage in the Science and Engineering Practices as outlined in A Framework for K-12 Science Education and the Next Generation Science Standards to learn about essential Big Ideas such as the structure, function and information processing, matter and energy in organisms, inheritance and variation of traits, natural selection, and evolution.

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  • Biology 114
    Prerequisite: None
    Description:

    A laboratory course emphasizing scientific inquiry through selected concepts of biology, such as organization, function heredity, evolution, and ecology. Biological issues with personal and social implications will be introduced to enable students to make informed decisions. Writing assignments, as appropriate to the discipline, are part of the course.

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  • FUSE
    Prerequisite: None
    Description:

    Regular Engineering Design provides students with an introduction to engineering and machine design. Students will explore the fundamentals of engineering through the application of scientific principles to manufacturing processes. Students will conduct independent and collaborative investigations and solve problems relating to many fields of engineering, with an emphasis on practical design considerations. Students will engage in the Science and Engineering Practices as outlined in A Framework for K-12 Science Education and the Next Generation Science Standards to learn about essential Big Ideas such as force and motion, waves, and interactions of energy and matter.

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  • Exploring Computer Science
    Prerequisite: None
    Description:

    Exploring Computer Science is designed to introduce students to the breadth of the field of computer science through an exploration of engaging and accessible topics. Rather than focusing the entire course on learning particular software tools or programming languages, the course is designed to focus the conceptual ideas of computing and help students understand why certain tools or languages might be utilized to solve particular problems. The goal of Exploring Computer Science is to develop in students the computational thinking practices of algorithm development, problem solving and programming within the context of problems that are relevant to the lives of today’s students. Students will also be introduced to topics such as interface design, limits of computers and societal and ethical issues.

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  • IT Problem Solving
    Prerequisite: ECS
    Description:

    This course will give students hands-on experience in a wide range of modern information technology. Several IT concepts will be introduced that will provide a basis for further study in Information Technology. Students will work on a number of projects that will give perspectives on areas of IT including but not limited to: visual and/or robotic programming, social networking tools, web design and networking. Issues of security, privacy and ethics will also be examined. Students will leave the course with an understanding of the components of modern IT systems and the scope of knowledge needed to become an IT professional.

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  • Networking
    Prerequisite: IT Problem Solving
    Description:

    The IT Essentials: PC Hardware and Software curriculum provides an introduction to the computer hardware and software skills needed to help meet the growing demand for entry-level information and communication technology (ICT) professionals. The curriculum covers the fundamentals of PC technology, networking, and security, and also provides an introduction to advanced concepts. Students who complete this course will be able to describe the internal components of a computer, assemble a computer system, install an operating system, and troubleshoot using system tools and diagnostic software. Hands-on labs and Virtual Laptop and Virtual Desktop learning tools help students develop critical thinking and complex problem-solving skills. Cisco Packet Tracer simulation-based learning activities promote the exploration of network and networking security concepts and allow students to experiment with network behavior. IT Essentials: PC Hardware and Software is a hands-on, career-oriented e-learning solution with an emphasis on practical experience to help students develop fundamental computer skills, along with essential career skills. The curriculum helps students prepare for entry-level ICT career opportunities and the CompTIA A+ certification, which helps students differentiate themselves in the marketplace to advance their careers. In addition, the course provides a learning pathway to the CCNA Discovery and CCNA Exploration curricula.

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  • Web Design
    Prerequisite: IT Problem Solving
    Description:

    Site Development Associate teaches you essential Web page development skills. You will learn to develop Web sites using Hypertext Markup Language version 5 (HTML5) and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS). You will learn to write code manually, as well as use graphical user interface (GUI) authoring tools. You will also learn to insert images, create hyperlinks, and add tables, forms, video, and audio to your Web pages. In addition to learning about HTML5 and CSS coding, you will learn how to use HTML5 Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) to extend the functionality of Web pages, such as geolocation, drag-and drop, canvas, and offline Web applications. Other topics include validating your HTML code, recognizing the importance of search engine optimization (SEO), using style sheets extensively to format Web page content, and implementing fundamental design concepts. Throughout the course, you will learn how Web sites are developed as managed projects. You will also identify e-commerce solutions and relate Website development to business goals. Site Development Associate provides an introduction to tasks, job roles and careers in Web development. This course will teach you to work as a productive part of a Web site development team. Hands-on labs include real-world scenarios based on a previously live version of the Habitat for Humanity site. The CIW Web Foundations courses prepare students to take the CIW Web Foundations Associate certification exam.

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  • CIS 116
    Prerequisite: Qualifying COMPASS Score and acceptance to Dual Credit Program
    Description:

    This course introduces the features and capabilities of the Internet. While learning how to access the Internet, the students also will learn the underlying concepts and strategies involved. Various Internet tools are discussed along with the types of information and communications students can retrieve using these tools.

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  • PE I with Health
    Prerequisite: None
    Description:

    PE I Physical Education is an important course that gives you an opportunity to achieve an optimal fitness level, gain knowledge of various sports, and become a responsible young adult through teamwork and sportsmanship. Physical Education I is a semester-long course consisting of 1-2 week units and one quarter of health education. Health Education is an important course that is designed to enhance the awareness and knowledge of healthy lifestyle choices. The six adolescent risk behaviors (tobacco use, dietary patterns that contribute to disease, sedentary lifestyles, sexual behaviors, alcohol and drug use, and behaviors that result in intentional and unintentional injury) will be addressed while advocating for the students to make healthy choices for their overall health.

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  • PE II with Driver’s Education
    Prerequisite: None
    Description:

    PE II Physical Education is an important course that gives you an opportunity to achieve an optimal fitness level, gain knowledge of various sports, and through teamwork and sportsmanship become a responsible young adult. Physical Education II is a semester long course consisting of 1-2 week units and one quarter of health education. The Driver Education Program is a two-phase program. The first phase will be the classroom and it will be taught at Goode for 5.5 weeks. The two phases consist of classroom and behind the wheel (on street driving), which exceed the requirements set by the State of Illinois. Passing Drivers Education is a Chicago Public Schools graduation requirement with a minimum of 30 classroom hours per the Illinois State Board of Education.

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  • PE III
    Prerequisite: None
    Description:

    Physical Education III gives students an opportunity to achieve an optimal fitness level and gain knowledge of various fitness concepts and exercises. Free weights, machine weights and conditioning activities will be incorporated to work on overall health and wellness. Proper technique, safety precautions and proper application of the principles of training will be emphasized. A plan to achieve goals will be developed and implemented during this course. Physical Education III is a semester long course consisting of 2-4 week units and 600 minutes of sexual health education. Upon completion, with a passing grade, students will earn 1 credit hour towards the required graduation course of Physical Education.

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  • Spanish I
    Prerequisite: None
    Description:

    This course is designed to introduce non‐native Spanish‐ speaking students to basic functional proficiency in Spanish with an emphasis on vocabulary development. Students will learn basic conversational topics, such as greetings and farewells, making descriptions of yourself and others, finding out information, talking about one’s family, ordering food, identifying personal belongings, identifying public buildings and places, making plans, making purchases, etc. The course enhances four skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. The emphasis is on student‐student and student‐teacher interactions to stimulate real‐world situations.

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  • Spanish II
    Prerequisite: Spanish I
    Description:

    This intermediate course is designed to introduce students to more advanced grammar structures in Spanish with an emphasis on sentence structure and verb tenses. It continues to enhance and further develop the four basic skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Students will be able to speak and write in the present tense, past tense, and future tense plus the use of high frequency irregular verbs. Students will be able to read long passages and write paragraphs and short essays. The course focuses on the communicative-based approach that emphasizes fluency. As a result, students will engage in oral skits that model common real-life situations.

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  • Spanish Heritage I
    Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation
    Description:

    This course is for Spanish speakers who have a basic understanding of Spanish but are not necessarily wellversed in reading or writing the language. Students will work on basic grammar structures, vocabulary, writing and conversational skills and will explore the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world in an effort to gain a functional knowledge of the target language and culture/s.

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  • Spanish Heritage II
    Prerequisite: Spanish Heritage I
    Description:

    This course is for Spanish speakers who are able to speak, read and write Spanish at the basic to intermediate level. The focus is on intermediate grammar structures, vocabulary expansion and written compositions. Students will continue to work with literary texts and will continue to explore the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world.

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  • Art I
    Prerequisite: None
    Description:

    This course establishes knowledge of art elements and principles through experiences in two-dimensional and three-dimensional design problems. The first several weeks consist of building an awareness of the basic elements and principles of art and design. Students will experience artistic processes such as drawing and painting, printmaking, and sculpture. Art history and artistic movements will also be incorporated into the course.

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  • AP Studio Art 2D
    Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation
    Description:

    The AP Studio Art program is designed for students who are seriously interested in pursuing the experience of art. The course is not based on a written examination; instead, students submit a three section portfolio (Concentration, Breadth & Quality). Students must use the elements and principles of art & design (unity/variety, balance, emphasis, contrast, rhythm, repetition,proportion/scale, and figure-ground relationship) to develop their work. Students should have good attendance and must be prepared to work extensively in and out of class. The class will engage in on-going discussions and critiques, investigate work by contemporary artists, and visit local galleries. An overview of art criticism will also be included.

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  • Graphic Art
    Prerequisite: None
    Description:

    Digital Imaging is a basic course that introduces students to the fundamental elements and principles of design, layout skills, and use of the computer as a graphic design tool. Students will develop their ability to communicate visually and problem solve as it applies to print communication. A basic foundation of drawing, design, color theory, illustration, typography and design technology is addressed throughout this course. Students gain an introduction to computer hardware and a variety of software applications (Adobe Creative Cloud Suite design programs). Workplace skills, career portfolios, speaker visits, and field visitations based on current industry standards will be integrated.

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  • Journalism-Yearbook I and II
    Prerequisite: None
    Description:

    In this course, students will practice basic journalism concepts and skills aligned to the relevant CCSS including, news gathering/interviewing, news writing, copy editing and page design. Oral and written communication skills, as well as critical thinking and problem solving skills will be exercised.

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  • General Music
    Prerequisite: None
    Description:

    This course is designed for students to become more familiar with musical structure, language, notation, and instruments. This course also provides a survey of music history, genres, decades, careers, and appreciation beginning with the Middle Ages and concluding with popular musicians of today.

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